Agenda and minutes

Council
Thursday, 16th January, 2020 7.30 pm

Venue: Council Chamber - Civic Centre, High Street, Uxbridge UB8 1UW. View directions

Contact: Lloyd White, Head of Democratic Services  If you are attending the meeting, please enter via main reception and visit the security desk to sign-in and collect a visitors pass. You will then be directed to the Committee Room.

Items
No. Item

24.

Apologies for Absence

Minutes:

Apologies were received from Councillors Ahmad-Wallana, Chapman, Hurhangee, Jackson, Lakhmana, Oswell and Seaman-Digby.

25.

Minutes pdf icon PDF 204 KB

To receive the minutes of the meeting held on 12 September 2019 (attached)

Minutes:

RESOLVED:  That the minutes of the meeting of the Council held on 12 September 2019 be approved as a correct record.

26.

Mayor's Announcements

Minutes:

The Mayor congratulated Councillor Janet Gardner who had been honoured for her work supporting victims of domestic abuse, winning the Innovation and Service Transformation category at the 2019 Councillor Achievement Awards.

 

The Mayor reported the death of Charles Key, an ex-Councillor and Freeman of the Borough. A minute’s silence was held. The Mayor also announced that ex-Councillor and Mayor, Jill Rhodes, was seriously ill and advised that he would be sending a card and flowers on behalf of the Council.

 

The Mayor announced that he and the Deputy Mayor had attended 444 engagements since May 2019. Council was reminded that a charity quiz night was to be held on Wednesday 22 January 2020.

 

27.

Public Question Time pdf icon PDF 41 KB

To take questions submitted by members of the public in accordance with Council Procedure Rule 10.

Minutes:

5.1    QUESTION FROM MR TONY ELLIS OF KEWFERRY ROAD, NORTHWOOD TO THE CABINET MEMBER FOR PLANNING, TRANSPORTATION AND RECYCLING - COUNCILLOR BURROWS:

 

Approved planning applications contain a standard clause that work should be carried out between 08.00 and 18.00 on Mondays to Fridays, 08.00 and 13.00 on Saturdays and no work should be carried out on Sundays and Bank Holidays. A planning enforcement officer has stated that these conditions are only informative and cannot be enforced. What action can residents take against builders who constantly work outside the prescribed hours?

 

Councillor Burrows advised that, as Mr Ellis was not present, he would provide him with a written answer, as below:

 

Planning decision notices contain an informative which simply reminds applicants of the hours construction work should occur, and the legislation which governs such matters. The Planning Enforcement officer advised that the Council's Anti-social Behaviour and Investigations team (ASBIT) take action against out of hour's construction, not Planning Enforcement. This is because out of hour’s construction is not covered by planning legislation, but legislation which concerns noise disturbance. If out of hour’s construction occurs and is the subject of a complaint, it is investigated by the Council's Anti-social Behaviour and Investigations team. All complaints received are followed up on and investigated.

 

The Council will take robust action against builders who constantly work outside the prescribed hours. This might take the form of a Control of Pollution Act Notice. Failure to comply with such a notice can lead to prosecution in the Magistrates' Court and a substantial fine on conviction. Any resident who suffers from constant construction work outside of normal construction hours is encouraged to contact the Council’s Anti-social Behaviour and Investigations team.

 

I will ask officers to follow up directly with Mr Ellis concerning the specifics of any out of hour's construction noise disturbance he is suffering from.

 

5.2    QUESTION FROM MR TREVOR SHERLING OF WEDGEWOOD CLOSE, NORTHWOOD TO THE CABINET MEMBER FOR PLANNING, TRANSPORTATION AND RECYCLING - COUNCILLOR BURROWS:

 

When Planning enforcement open a case following a complaint, it is not usual for them to report back to the complainant on the findings - surely residents have the right to be so informed?

 

Councillor Burrows thanked Mr Sherling for his question, and advised that the Council's planning enforcement team did report back to complainants with the findings of each investigation, whether this was to advise that a breach had been voluntarily resolved, a notice had been served or other form of action taken. However, because of the processes that had to be followed, the time between updates could be long. Planning appeals against enforcement notices were cited as an example, as they could take between 6 and 12 months for external appointed planning inspectors to make a decision.

 

Councillor Burrows confirmed that the Council was currently improving its ICT and webpages so that more detailed case updates could be viewed on-line by complainants. The Council's Communications Team was also widely publicising successful prosecutions, to ensure those acted as a deterrent against residents breaching planning regulations. The next issue of Hillingdon People was to have features on a number of recent planning enforcement prosecutions where substantive fines had been imposed by the courts. These included a recent case where a Hayes landlord had been ordered to pay more than £430,000 under the Proceeds of Crime Act after turning her property into an illegal House of Multiple Occupation. This particular case had been reported in both the Evening Standard and Metro newspapers.

 

The Cabinet Member concluded by stating that he hoped Mr Sherling could see that the Council was taking steps to improve its communications by updating its ICT capabilities, and that information was shared with residents and complainants, when information was available.

28.

Report of the Head of Democratic Services pdf icon PDF 89 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

i)        Urgent Implementation of Decisions

 

Councillor Puddifoot moved, and Councillor Simmonds seconded, the recommendation as set out on the Order of Business and it was:

 

RESOLVED:  That the Urgency decisions detailed in the report be noted.

 

ii)      Appointment of Cabinet and Amendments to Cabinet Portfolios

Councillor Puddifoot moved, and Councillor Simmonds seconded, the recommendation as set out on the Order of Business and it was:

 

RESOLVED: That the consequential amendments arising from the Cabinet portfolio changes in Article 8, Part 3 and Schedule H of the Constitution as set out in Appendix A of the report be approved, to take effect from 17 January 2020.

 

iii)   Appointment of Council Committees 2019/2020

 

Councillor Puddifoot moved, and Councillor Simmonds seconded, the recommendation as set out on the Order of Business and it was:

 

RESOLVED: That the changes to committee memberships, as nominated by the Conservative group, be approved as follows:

 

·           Residents, Education and Environmental Services Policy Overview Committee – Councillor Morgan to replace Councillor Makwana

·           Social Care, Housing and Public Health Policy Overview Committee – Councillor Brightman to replace Councillor Palmer and Councillor Makwana to replace Councillor Flynn

·           Central and South Planning Committee – Councillor Morgan to replace Councillor Edwards

·           Major Applications Planning Committee – Councillor Morgan to replace Councillor Edwards

·           Major Applications Planning Sub-Committee – Councillor Haggar to replace Councillor Edwards

·           Appointments Committee – Councillor Bianco to replace Councillor Simmonds. Councillors O’Brien and Palmer to replace Councillors Bianco and Lavery as nominated substitutes.

·           Appointments Sub-Committee - Councillor Bianco to replace Councillor Simmonds. Councillors O’Brien and Palmer to replace Councillor Bianco on the list of nominated substitutes.

·           Registration and Appeals Committee – Councillor Goddard to replace Councillor O’Brien. Councillor O’Brien to replace Councillor Simmonds as a nominated substitute. Councillor Seaman-Digby to be removed from the list of nominated substitutes.

·           Standards Committee – Councillor Bridges to replace Councillor Flynn. Councillor R.Mills to replace Councillor Bridges as the nominated substitute.

·           Audit Committee – Councillor Flynn to replace Councillor O’Brien.

·           Investigating and Disciplinary Sub-Committee – Councillor Bianco to replace Councillor Simmonds. Councillors O’Brien and Palmer to replace Councillor Bianco on the list of nominated substitutes.

·           Health and Wellbeing Board – In accordance with the Constitution all Cabinet members are members of the Board and, therefore, Councillors O’Brien and Palmer will become members of the Board and Councillor Simmonds will be removed from the Board. In accordance with the revised Cabinet portfolios, Councillor Palmer will be the Chairman of the Board and Councillor Bianco, the Vice-Chairman.

 

iv)   Programme of Meetings 2020/2021

 

Councillor Puddifoot moved, and Councillor Simmonds seconded, the recommendation as set out on the Order of Business and it was:

 

RESOLVED: That the timetable of meetings for 2020/21, as set out in Appendix A to these minutes, be approved and the Head of Democratic Services in consultation with the Chief Whip of the Majority Party be authorised to make any amendments that may be required throughout the course of the year.

 

NB: Members were asked to note that the Whips’ Meeting shown in the Programme for 7 July would, in fact, take place on 14 July.

29.

Polling District and Polling Places Review pdf icon PDF 2 MB

To consider the outcome of the recent consultation and determine Polling Places for 2020 to 2022 and 2022 onwards (attached)

Additional documents:

Minutes:

CouncillorD.Mills moved, and Councillor Lewis seconded, the recommendation as set out on the Order of Business.

 

Following debate, (Councillor Milani), the recommendation was put to a vote and it was:

 

RESOLVED: That the proposed polling arrangements within the Borough for both 2020 – 2022, and also 2022 onwards, be approved.

 

30.

Council Tax Base and Business Rates Forecast 2020/2021 pdf icon PDF 100 KB

To consider the report of the Corporate Director of Finance (attached)

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Councillor Bianco moved, and Councillor Puddifoot seconded, the recommendations as set out on the Order of Business and it was:

 

RESOLVED: That:

 

a)     the report of the Corporate Director of Finance for the calculation of the Council Tax Base and the Business Rates Forecast be approved.

 

b)     in accordance with the Local Authorities (Calculation of Council Tax Base) (England) Regulations 2012 the amount calculated by the London Borough of Hillingdon as its Council Tax Base for 2020/21 shall be 102,107.

 

c)     the Corporate Director of Finance be authorised to submit the 2020/21 NNDR1 return to the Ministry of Housing, Communities & Local Government (MHCLG) and the Greater London Authority (GLA).

 

d)     the continuation of the Council’s policy of passporting Government discounts and reliefs applied to Business Rates to the ratepayer, be noted.

 

e)     having due regard to the Review Of Working Age Council Tax Reduction Scheme for 2020/21 at Appendix 2 and the Equalities Impact Assessment at Appendix 2a, the following amendments to the Council’s local Council Tax Reduction Scheme to reform the scheme with effect from 1 April 2020, be approved:

 

          i.             Introduction of a Banding Scheme for Working Age Claimants, including simplification of non-dependent deductions and earnings disregards;

        ii.             Reducing the capital limit for the scheme from £16k to £6k in line with Universal Credit,

       iii.             Establishing a £1 minimum weekly award, and;

       iv.             Maintaining current protections for those households in receipt of higher levels of support within the current scheme due to having more than two children prior to 31 March 2018.

31.

Statement of Gambling Policy pdf icon PDF 131 KB

To consider the recommendations of Cabinet (attached)

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Councillor D.Mills moved, and Councillor Lavery seconded, the recommendation as set out on the Order of Business and it was:

 

RESOLVED:  That the Statement of Gambling Policy 2019-2022 be approved.

32.

Local Plan Part II pdf icon PDF 223 KB

To consider the recommendations of Cabinet (attached)

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Councillor Burrows moved, and Councillor Tuckwell seconded, the recommendations as set out on the Order of Business.

 

Following debate (Councillor Duncan), the recommendations were put to a vote and it was:

 

RESOLVED: That:

 

a)    the Local Plan Part 2 as subsequently amended by the main and minor modifications, and the post examination corrections (Appendices 3&4) be adopted and

 

b)   the revised Local Plan Policies Map as subsequently amended by the main and minor modifications (Appendix 5) be adopted.

 

 

33.

Development of a Dockless Bike Byelaw Across Greater London pdf icon PDF 110 KB

To consider the adoption of a new byelaw (attached)

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Councillor Burrows moved, and Councillor Arnold seconded, the recommendations as set out on the Order of Business, and it was:

 

RESOLVED: That

 

a)         Consideration be given to the proposals set out in this report for the introduction of a docklessbike byelaw in Greater London being proposed by the London Councils Transport & Environment Committee (LCTEC) and, if approved, authority be delegated to LCTEC to exercise the following function by way of an addition to the Part 3(D) Functions (within LCTEC Governing Agreement [consolidated version] 13th December 2001) inserting a new paragraph 2(c) as follows:

 

[c][i] the making of byelaws under section 235 of the Local Government Act 1972 (and, in respect of the City of London Corporation, under section 39 of the City of London (Various Powers) Act 1961) for the purpose of regulating dockless vehicles on the highway and/or public places (including by making it an offence for a dockless vehicle operator to cause or permit their dockless vehicle to be left on the highway or public place other than in an approved location), including taking all related steps to promote, make, amend and revoke any such byelaw.

 

[c][ii] the exercise of powers under Section 1 of the Localism Act 2011 for the purposes of give effect to (i) above, including but not limited to oversight and management of the arrangements (but excluding prosecution or other enforcement).

 

b)        the Deputy Chief Executive and Corporate Director of Residents Services write to London Councils to set out the decision made by Council.

 

34.

Motions pdf icon PDF 94 KB

To consider Motions submitted by Members in accordance with Council Procedure Rule 12

Minutes:

12.1    MOTION FROM COUNCILLOR BIANCO

 

Councillor Bianco moved, and Councillor Corthorne seconded, the following motion:

 

That this Council:

 

·           Notes the clear international evidence base showing that global climate change is real and the latest 2018 United Nations Intergovernmental Panel report advising governments across the world to limit global warming to 1.5°C, acknowledging that this in itself would require unprecedented changes yet could be achieved in tandem with proactive sustainable development and a move to greener economies.

·           Welcomes efforts by successive UK governments leading the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions and setting a new target in 2019 for net-zero emissions (compared to 1990 levels) by 2050. Furthermore, reflects that in May 2019, the UK Parliament declared an environment and climate emergency.

·           Recognises Hillingdon as London’s greenest borough and recalls:

  • The substantial investment in award winning parks and open spaces over many years, protecting and enhancing local environments for future generations;
  • That in 2007, the Leader of the Council signed the Nottingham Declaration on Climate Change, establishing Hillingdon’s firm commitment to tackling the issue;
  • That Hillingdon’s Cabinet in 2009 adopted a Climate Change Strategy, which set out new targets to reduce carbon emissions and for more efficient energy use;
  • That in 2013, the then Corporate Services & Partnerships Policy Overview Committee undertook a major review into how Council was reducing its carbon footprint.

·         Welcomes the fact that, through its transformation programme, the Council has become greener and leaner, saving taxpayer money and is delivering, amongst other things:

  • A 53% reduction in carbon dioxide emissions from 5 years ago from non-domestic electricity and gas supplies;
  • A planned new contract from 2020 to provide electricity for council properties and schools from 100% certified renewable sources;
  • A LED street lighting programme, replacing 23,700 sodium lights to be more energy efficient;
  • Active measures to improve local air quality and deter people from leaving their vehicle engine idling, particularly around schools;
  • More ways to reduce plastic waste that ends up in landfill or as litter, such as through the provision of new drinking fountains in the Borough’s parks;
  • Urban greening initiatives and the planting of new trees across the Borough, including offering 5000 free saplings for residents to grow.

·         Notwithstanding these efforts, Council re-affirms its deep concern and opposition to Heathrow expansion as a most egregious proposal contributing to climate change, along with devastating environmental impacts locally.

·         Looking to the future, this Council declares that there is a current global climate emergency and, as a consequence, agrees to extend the Council’s climate change targets beyond those currently set, as follows:

o  To become carbon neutral across the Council services by 2030 and;

o  To achieve 100% clean energy across the Council’s services by 2030.

·         Furthermore, resolves that, to meet these targets practically and be accountable to residents for them:

  • Recognise that, initially, they will span the Council’s direct services and, subject to future review by the Cabinet, may grow to encompass the Council’s wider commercial supply chain;
  • The Cabinet Member for Housing and the Environment, in consultation with the Leader of the Council assumes a new Executive responsibility within the Council’s Constitution for climate change strategy;
  • Responsibility for oversight and scrutiny of the Council’s efforts in relation to climate change be given to the Corporate Services, Commerce and Communities Policy Overview Committee to review as they see fit and engage the community;
  • The Chief Executive designate a lead officer to act corporately on climate change and in pursuit of the above targets;
  • An annual action plan be submitted to Cabinet, aligned with the budget, to monitor achievement. Furthermore, a review of environmental performance reporting be undertaken to actively engage staff in ways to tackle climate change in their service areas and communicate progress more widely to residents.’

 

Following debate (Councillors Denys and Hensley) Councillor Mathers moved, and Councillor Milani seconded, the following amendment:

 

To a) remove the words shown as crossed out below and b) insert the word in bold italics so that the motion would read as follows:

 

“That this Council:

 

·            Notes the clear international evidence base showing that global climate change is real and the latest 2018 United Nations Intergovernmental Panel report advising governments across the world to limit global warming to 1.5°C, acknowledging that this in itself would require unprecedented changes yet could be achieved in tandem with proactive sustainable development and a move to greener economies.

·            Welcomes efforts by successive UK governments leading the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions and setting a new target in 2019 for net-zero emissions (compared to 1990 levels) by 2050. Furthermore, reflects that in May 2019, the UK Parliament declared an environment and climate emergency.

·           Recognises Hillingdon as London’s greenest borough and recalls:

  • The substantial investment in award winning parks and open spaces over many years, protecting and enhancing local environments for future generations;
  • That in 2007, the Leader of the Council signed the Nottingham Declaration on Climate Change, establishing Hillingdon’s firm commitment to tackling the issue;
  • That Hillingdon’s Cabinet in 2009 adopted a Climate Change Strategy, which set out new targets to reduce carbon emissions and for more efficient energy use;
  • That in 2013, the then Corporate Services & Partnerships Policy Overview Committee undertook a major review into how Council was reducing its carbon footprint.

·         Welcomes the fact that, through its transformation programme, the Council has become greener and leaner, saving taxpayer money and is delivering, amongst other things:

  • A 53% reduction in carbon dioxide emissions from 5 years ago from non-domestic electricity and gas supplies;
  • A planned new contract from 2020 to provide electricity for council properties and schools from 100% certified renewable sources;
  • A LED street lighting programme, replacing 23,700 sodium lights to be more energy efficient;
  • Active measures to improve local air quality and deter people from leaving their vehicle engine idling, particularly around schools;
  • More ways to reduce plastic waste that ends up in landfill or as litter, such as through the provision of new drinking fountains in the Borough’s parks;
  • Urban greening initiatives and the planting of new trees across the Borough, including offering 5000 free saplings for residents to grow.

·         Notwithstanding these efforts, Council re-affirms its deep concern and opposition to Heathrow expansion as a most egregious proposal contributing to climate change, along with devastating environmental impacts locally.

·         Looking to the future, this Council declares that there is a current global climate emergency and, as a consequence, agrees to join many other local authorities nationwide to extend the Council’s climate change targets beyond those currently set, as follows:

o  To become carbon neutral across the Council services by 2030 and;

o  To achieve 100% clean energy across the Council’s services by 2030.

·         Furthermore, resolves that, to meet these targets practically and be accountable to residents for them:

  • Recognise that, initially, they will span the Council’s direct services and, subject to future review by the Cabinet, may will grow to encompass the Council’s wider commercial supply chain;
  • The Cabinet Member for Housing and the Environment, in consultation with the Leader of the Council assumes a new Executive responsibility within the Council’s Constitution for climate change strategy;

·            Responsibility for oversight and scrutiny of the Council’s efforts in relation to climate change be given to the Corporate Services, Commerce and Communities Policy Overview Committee to review as they see fit on an annual basis and engage the community;

  • The Chief Executive designate a lead officer to act corporately on climate change and in pursuit of the above targets;
  • An annual action plan be submitted to Cabinet,An updated climate strategy to achieve this be subject to public consultation within the next 12 months and submitted to Cabinet followed by annual action plans aligned with the budget, to monitor achievement. Furthermore, a review of environmental performance reporting be undertaken to actively engage staff in ways to tackle climate change in their service areas and communicate progress more widely to residents.’
  • The Council will support and work with all other relevant agencies towards making the entire borough zero carbon within the same timescale;
  • The Council will take steps to proactively include young people in the process, ensuring that they have a voice in shaping the future;
  • The Council will publicly report on the level of investment in the fossil fuel industry that our pensions plans and other investments have, and review the Council’s investment strategy to give consideration to climate change impacts in the investment portfolio.

 

Following debate (Councillors Corthorne and Sweeting), the amended motion was put to a recorded vote:

 

Those voting for: Councillors Allen, Birah, Bliss, Curling, Dhillon, Dhot, Duncan, Eginton, Farley, Gardner, Mathers, Milani, Money, Morse, Nelson, Prince, Sansarpuri, Singh, and Sweeting.

 

Those voting against: the Mayor Councillor Yarrow, the Deputy Mayor Councillor Barnes, Councillors Arnold, Bianco, Bridges, Brightman, Burrows, Chamdal, Choubedar, Cooper, Corthorne, Denys, Deville, Edwards, Flynn, Fyfe, Goddard, Graham, Haggar, Hensley, Higgins, Kauffman, Lavery, Lewis, Makwana, Markham, Melvin, D.Mills, R.Mills, Morgan, O’Brien, Palmer, Puddifoot, Radia, Riley, Rodrigues, Simmonds, Stead, and Tuckwell.

 

Those abstaining: None.

 

The amended motion was lost.

 

The original motion was then put to a recorded vote.

 

Those voting for: the Mayor Councillor Yarrow, the Deputy Mayor Councillor Barnes, Councillors Allen, Arnold, Bianco, Birah, Bliss, Bridges, Brightman, Burrows, Chamdal, Choubedar, Cooper, Corthorne, Curling, Denys, Deville, Dhillon, Dhot, Duncan, Edwards, Eginton, Farley, Flynn, Fyfe, Gardner. Goddard, Graham, Haggar, Hensley, Higgins, Kauffman, Lavery, Lewis, Makwana, Mathers, Markham, Melvin, Milani, D.Mills, R.Mills, Money, Morgan, Morse, Nelson, O’Brien, Palmer, Prince, Puddifoot, Radia, Riley, Rodrigues, Sansarpuri, Simmonds, Singh, Stead, Sweeting, and Tuckwell.

 

Those voting against: None.

 

Those abstaining: None.

 

The motion was unanimously carried, and it was:

 

RESOLVED: That the Council:

 

·           Notes the clear international evidence base showing that global climate change is real and the latest 2018 United Nations Intergovernmental Panel report advising governments across the world to limit global warming to 1.5°C, acknowledging that this in itself would require unprecedented changes yet could be achieved in tandem with proactive sustainable development and a move to greener economies.

·           Welcomes efforts by successive UK governments leading the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions and setting a new target in 2019 for net-zero emissions (compared to 1990 levels) by 2050. Furthermore, reflects that in May 2019, the UK Parliament declared an environment and climate emergency.

·           Recognises Hillingdon as London’s greenest borough and recalls:

  • The substantial investment in award winning parks and open spaces over many years, protecting and enhancing local environments for future generations;
  • That in 2007, the Leader of the Council signed the Nottingham Declaration on Climate Change, establishing Hillingdon’s firm commitment to tackling the issue;
  • That Hillingdon’s Cabinet in 2009 adopted a Climate Change Strategy, which set out new targets to reduce carbon emissions and for more efficient energy use;
  • That in 2013, the then Corporate Services & Partnerships Policy Overview Committee undertook a major review into how Council was reducing its carbon footprint.

·         Welcomes the fact that, through its transformation programme, the Council has become greener and leaner, saving taxpayer money and is delivering, amongst other things:

  • A 53% reduction in carbon dioxide emissions from 5 years ago from non-domestic electricity and gas supplies;
  • A planned new contract from 2020 to provide electricity for council properties and schools from 100% certified renewable sources;
  • A LED street lighting programme, replacing 23,700 sodium lights to be more energy efficient;
  • Active measures to improve local air quality and deter people from leaving their vehicle engine idling, particularly around schools;
  • More ways to reduce plastic waste that ends up in landfill or as litter, such as through the provision of new drinking fountains in the Borough’s parks;
  • Urban greening initiatives and the planting of new trees across the Borough, including offering 5000 free saplings for residents to grow.

·         Notwithstanding these efforts, Council re-affirms its deep concern and opposition to Heathrow expansion as a most egregious proposal contributing to climate change, along with devastating environmental impacts locally.

·         Looking to the future, this Council declares that there is a current global climate emergency and, as a consequence, agrees to extend the Council’s climate change targets beyond those currently set, as follows:

o  To become carbon neutral across the Council services by 2030 and;

o  To achieve 100% clean energy across the Council’s services by 2030.

·         Furthermore, resolves that, to meet these targets practically and be accountable to residents for them:

  • Recognise that, initially, they will span the Council’s direct services and, subject to future review by the Cabinet, may grow to encompass the Council’s wider commercial supply chain;
  • The Cabinet Member for Housing and the Environment, in consultation with the Leader of the Council assumes a new Executive responsibility within the Council’s Constitution for climate change strategy;
  • Responsibility for oversight and scrutiny of the Council’s efforts in relation to climate change be given to the Corporate Services, Commerce and Communities Policy Overview Committee to review as they see fit and engage the community;
  • The Chief Executive designate a lead officer to act corporately on climate change and in pursuit of the above targets;
  • An annual action plan be submitted to Cabinet, aligned with the budget, to monitor achievement. Furthermore, a review of environmental performance reporting be undertaken to actively engage staff in ways to tackle climate change in their service areas and communicate progress more widely to residents.’

 

12.3 MOTION FROM COUNCILLOR EGINTON

 

Councillor Eginton moved, and Councillor Mathers seconded, the following motion:

 

That this Council notes the need to take account of climate change when planning for our sustainable future.

 

In December of 2018 the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change reported a climate change forecast leading to a devastating future for our planet if we do not take drastic and immediate action to tackle climate change.

 

In this regard this Council asks Cabinet to determine ways in which the Council can improve the outlook for Residents. In particular, this will include, although not exclusively:

 

1.         Council owned residential properties

a)    Determine the Energy Performance Certificate rating for all such properties

b)    Arrange for a strategy to improve all such properties with the installation or replacement of insulation, energy-efficient heating boilers, solar panels and heat-exchange pumps.

2.         Other Council properties - establish arrangements to encourage all commercial lessees to invest in improvements to their properties so as to reduce energy consumption

3.         Provide support to local businesses and social-sector organisations and landlords, particularly those which are smaller and medium sized, to improve the energy efficiency of their properties.

4.         Set out arrangements to provide charging points on residential streets where off-street parking is not generally available.

 

Councillor Corthorne moved, and Councillor Morgan seconded, an amendment to a) remove the words shown as crossed out below and b) insert the words in bold italics so that the motion would read as follows:

 

“That this Council notes the need to take account of climate change when planning for our sustainable future and congratulates the Conservative Administration for proposing and adopting a comprehensive policy approach to dealing with this important issue rather than a silo mentality.

 

In December of 2018 the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change reported a climate change forecast leading to a devastating future for our planet if we do not take drastic and immediate action to tackle climate change.

 

In this regard Council asks CabinetWhilst recognising that it is only a small element of the actions required to adequately deal with the environment and climate emergency the Labour Group asks the Cabinet Member responsible for climate change issues to determine ways in which the Council can improve the outlook for Residents. In particular, this will include, although not exclusively:

 

1.        Council owned residential properties

a)    Determine the Energy Performance Certificate rating for all such properties

b)    Arrange for a strategy to improve all such properties with the installation or replacement of insulation, energy-efficient heating boilers, solar panels and heat-exchange pumps.

2.        Other Council properties - establish arrangements to encourage all commercial lessees to invest in improvements to their properties so as to reduce energy consumption

3.        Provide support to local businesses and social-sector organisations and landlords, particularly those which are smaller and medium sized, to improve the energy efficiency of their properties.

4.        Set out arrangements to provide charging points on residential streets where off-street parking is not generally available.”

 

Following debate (Councillors Dhot, Dhillon, and Eginton), the amended motion was put to a vote and carried.

 

The substantive motion was then put to a vote. The motion was unanimously carried and it was:

 

RESOLVED: “That this Council notes the need to take account of climate change when planning for our sustainable future and congratulates the Conservative Administration for proposing and adopting a comprehensive policy approach to dealing with this important issue rather than a silo mentality.

 

In December of 2018 the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change reported a climate change forecast leading to a devastating future for our planet if we do not take drastic and immediate action to tackle climate change.

 

Whilst recognising that it is only a small element of the actions required to adequately deal with the environment and climate emergency the Labour Group asks the Cabinet Member responsible for climate change issues to determine ways in which the Council can improve the outlook for Residents. In particular, this will include, although not exclusively:

 

1.      Council owned residential properties

a)    Determine the Energy Performance Certificate rating for all such properties

b)    Arrange for a strategy to improve all such properties with the installation or replacement of insulation, energy-efficient heating boilers, solar panels and heat-exchange pumps.

2.      Other Council properties - establish arrangements to encourage all commercial lessees to invest in improvements to their properties so as to reduce energy consumption

3.      Provide support to local businesses and social-sector organisations and landlords, particularly those which are smaller and medium sized, to improve the energy efficiency of their properties.

4.      Set out arrangements to provide charging points on residential streets where off-street parking is not generally available.

 

12.2 MOTION FROM COUNCILLOR D.MILLS

 

Councillor D.Mills moved, and Councillor R.Mills seconded, the following motion:

 

That this Council notes the decisive outcome of the recent General Election and welcomes the statement made by the Prime Minister that a new hospital would be built in his Uxbridge & South Ruislip constituency. Council agrees that it will work with health authorities at both local and national level to ensure that all phases of this project are in line with putting our residents first.

 

Council further notes that John McDonnell was returned as MP for Hayes & Harlington and that one of its Members, Councillor David Simmonds, was successful in becoming the local MP for Ruislip, Northwood and Pinner and looks forward to him raising issues with the Government, of benefit to the Council and local government in general.

 

Following debate (Councillors Arnold, Curling, Dhillon, Flynn, Prince, Puddifoot, Simonds, and Riley) the motion was put to a vote.

 

The motion was unanimously carried, and it was:

 

RESOLVED: That this Council notes the decisive outcome of the recent General Election and welcomes the statement made by the Prime Minister that a new hospital would be built in his Uxbridge & South Ruislip constituency. Council agrees that it will work with health authorities at both local and national level to ensure that all phases of this project are in line with putting our residents first.

 

Council further notes that John McDonnell was returned as MP for Hayes & Harlington and that one of its Members, Councillor David Simmonds, was successful in becoming the local MP for Ruislip, Northwood and Pinner and looks forward to him raising issues with the Government, of benefit to the Council and local government in general.

 

12.4 MOTION FROM COUNCILLOR MATHERS

 

Councillor Mathers moved, and Councillor Nelson seconded, the following motion:

 

That this Council notes that the Residents, Education and Environment Policy and Overview Committee is currently undertaking a major review on the effectiveness of this council’s approach to tacking the growing problem of fly-tipping. It is a blight in our communities and it negatively affects how residents feel about the places where they live.

 

The POC review will provide recommendations to further tackle this issue within our current powers as a local authority. However beyond these recommendations this Council believes there is a strong case for further action and calls for new powers and funding for Local Authorities to tackle this issue.

 

In 2016 the Government gave local authorities the power to issue fines of up to £400. The current £400 fine barely cover the costs of clean up; do not cover the cost of Enforcement Teams and do not provide sufficient disincentive to offenders.

 

According to the LGA, fly-tipping has risen by almost 40% since 2012. Education should remain a fundamental element of our approach in tackling fly-tipping but local authorities require greater support in our efforts against prolific and deliberate offenders. The LGA recently reported, no offender has yet been given the maximum £50,000 fine or 12 months in prison introduced in 2014.

 

This Council calls on the Cabinet to petition and lobby the Government to campaign for the following:

·                An increase in the fines Local Authorities can levy – ideally an increase to £2,000.

·                Additional revenue support for councils to investigate and prosecute fly-tippers

·                Make it compulsory that Local Authorities are reimbursed for costs of clearing fly-tipping in addition to legal costs from fines issued in court.

·                A review of the guidance to the courts to ensure offenders face tougher sentences.

 

Councillor D.Mills moved, and Councillor Kauffman seconded, an amendment to a) remove the words shown as crossed out below and b) insert the words in bold italics so that the motion would read as follows:

 

"That this Council notes that the Residents, Education and Environment Policy and Overview Committee is currently undertaking a major review on the effectiveness of this council’s approach to tacking the growing problem of fly-tipping. It is a blight in our communities and it negatively affects how residents feel about the places where they live.

 

The POC review will provide recommendations to further tackle this issue within our current powers as a local authority. However beyond these recommendations this Council believes there is a strong case for further action and calls for new powers and funding for Local Authorities to tackle this issue.

 

In 2016 the Government gave local authorities the power to issue fines of up to £400. The current £400 fine barely cover the costs of clean up; do not cover the cost of Enforcement Teams and do not provide sufficient disincentive to offenders.

 

According to the LGA, fly-tipping has risen by almost 40% since 2012. Education should remain a fundamental element of our approach in tackling fly-tipping but local authorities require greater support in our efforts against prolific and deliberate offenders. The LGA recently reported, no offender has yet been given the maximum £50,000 fine or 12 months in prison introduced in 2014.

 

This Council calls on the Cabinet to petition and lobby the Government to campaign for the following:

·                An increase in the fines Local Authorities can levy – ideally an increase to £2,000.

·                Additional revenue support for councils to investigate and prosecute fly-tippers

·                Make it compulsory that Local Authorities are reimbursed for costs of clearing fly-tipping in addition to legal costs from fines issued in court.

·                A review of the guidance to the courts to ensure offenders face tougher sentences.

 

This Council notes that whilst there was no mention of fly tipping penalties or issues in the 2019 Labour Party Manifesto, The Conservative Party Manifesto stated "We will crack down on the waste and carelessness that destroys our natural environment and kills marine life. We will increase penalties for fly-tipping, make those on community sentences clean up their parks and street".

 

Accordingly this Council will work with the Government, as appropriate, to deliver that Manifesto commitment.”

 

Following debate (Councillors Mathers, Puddifoot, Sweeting) the amended motion was put to a vote and carried.

 

The substantive motion was then put to a vote, and it was:

 

RESOLVED: "That this Council notes that the Residents, Education and Environment Policy and Overview Committee is currently undertaking a major review on the effectiveness of this council’s approach to tacking the growing problem of fly-tipping. It is a blight in our communities and it negatively affects how residents feel about the places where they live.

 

The POC review will provide recommendations to further tackle this issue within our current powers as a local authority. However beyond these recommendations this Council believes there is a strong case for further action and calls for new powers and funding for Local Authorities to tackle this issue.

 

In 2016 the Government gave local authorities the power to issue fines of up to £400. The current £400 fine barely cover the costs of clean up; do not cover the cost of Enforcement Teams and do not provide sufficient disincentive to offenders.

 

According to the LGA, fly-tipping has risen by almost 40% since 2012. Education should remain a fundamental element of our approach in tackling fly-tipping but local authorities require greater support in our efforts against prolific and deliberate offenders. The LGA recently reported, no offender has yet been given the maximum £50,000 fine or 12 months in prison introduced in 2014.

 

This Council notes that whilst there was no mention of fly tipping penalties or issues in the 2019 Labour Party Manifesto, The Conservative Party Manifesto stated "We will crack down on the waste and carelessness that destroys our natural environment and kills marine life. We will increase penalties for fly-tipping, make those on community sentences clean up their parks and street".

 

Accordingly this Council will work with the Government, as appropriate, to deliver that Manifesto commitment.”

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