Agenda and draft minutes

Council
Thursday, 9th September, 2021 7.30 pm

Venue: Council Chamber - Civic Centre, High Street, Uxbridge UB8 1UW. View directions

Contact: Lloyd White, Head of Democratic Services 

Link: Watch a LIVE or archived broadcast of this meeting here

Items
No. Item

22.

Apologies for Absence

Minutes:

Apologies for absence had been received from Councillors Duncan, Graham, Hurhangee, Kauffman, Lewis, Markham, Milani, Seaman-Digby, Singh and Stead.

23.

Minutes pdf icon PDF 211 KB

To receive the minutes of the meeting held on 15 July 2021 (attached)

Minutes:

RESOLVED:  That the minutes of the meeting held on 15 July 2021 be agreed as a correct record. 

24.

Declarations of Interest

To note any declarations of interest in any matter before the Council

Minutes:

Councillor Mathers declared a non-pecuniary interest in Agenda Item 9.4, as it related to his employment, and left the room during the consideration thereof.

25.

Mayor's Announcements

To receive the Mayoral announcements.

Minutes:

The Mayor advised that he had attended a number of events including a tea dance on the Civic Centre forecourt and a wreath laying ceremony at the Polish War Memorial where he had been honoured to meet a 99 year old veteran.  He had also attended the inaugural annual Emergency Services flag raising ceremony on the forecourt to commemorate the important role that these services played. 

 

Hillingdon had performed well in the London Youth Games with the girls’ teams winning medals in hockey and netball and the boys’ winning medals in football.  The Mayor also congratulated Natasha Baker for her medal winning performance in the recent Tokyo 2020 Paralympic Games. 

 

The Mayor spoke about those people affected by the situation in Afghanistan and noted that it had been almost twenty years since 9/11. 

 

The Mayor urged all residents to ensure that they had their Covid vaccinations.

26.

Report of the Head of Democratic Services pdf icon PDF 57 KB

Minutes:

i)       URGENT IMPLEMENTATION OF DECISIONS

 

The recent urgent decisions taken were noted.

27.

Proposed Article 4 Direction pdf icon PDF 141 KB

To consider the making of an Article 4 Direction (attached)

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Councillor Lavery moved, and Councillor Edwards seconded, the recommendations as set out on the Order of Business and it was:

 

RESOLVED: That:

a)  the Assistant Director of Planning and Regeneration be instructed to make a non-immediate Article 4 direction (with an indicative implementation date of September 2022) to remove the Part 3 Class MA permitted development right in limited geographical areas, as set out in Paragraph 6 of the report and mapped on Appendix 1.

b)  the Assistant Director of Planning and Regeneration be authorised to prepare the Article 4 direction and instructed to carry out all necessary consequential arrangements to give effect to the terms of Recommendation a), which shall include publishing the making of the direction, seeking representations on the making of the direction and notifying affected property owners/occupiers and the Secretary of State, as well as submitting any further evidence if necessary.

28.

Annual Report of the Audit Committee pdf icon PDF 66 KB

To receive the annual report (attached)

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Councillor Flynn moved, and Councillor Morgan seconded, the recommendation as set out on the Order of Business.  Following debate (Councillors Eginton and Goddard), it was:

 

RESOLVED:  That the annual report of the Audit Committee 2020/21 be noted.

29.

Members' Questions pdf icon PDF 42 KB

To take questions submitted by Members in accordance with Council Procedure Rule 11

Minutes:

8.3       QUESTION SUBMITTED BY COUNCILLOR TUCKWELL TO THE CABINET MEMBER FOR ENVIRONMENT, HOUSING & REGENERATION- COUNCILLOR LAVERY:

 

“Can the Cabinet Member please update me on the progress of the rollout of the separate Food Waste Collection Service and how this will contribute to the Council's Climate Change Plan?”

 

Councillor Lavery advised that, in May 2021, the Council had moved to a separate collection service for food waste across the Borough rather than it being collected with the garden waste.  Promotional and educational activity had been undertaken over the summer which had increased residents’ participation in food waste recycling from 30,000 households to 39,000.  Once collected, the food waste was processed at a plant in Surrey where it was turned into electricity. 

 

It was noted that the gases created by food waste in landfill made up 10% of greenhouse gasses globally.  In Hillingdon, a survey had revealed that around 40% of black bag waste was food. 

 

By way of a supplementary question, Councillor Tuckwell asked whether there were any plans to expand the service further in Hillingdon.

 

Councillor Lavery advised that the food waste collection service had previously only been available to houses as they were the households that had been in receipt of the green waste collection.  The new separate collection service meant that it was now available to flats and maisonettes and action was being taken to extend it to bigger flatted developments. 

 

The Cabinet Member encouraged all Members to participate in the food waste collection scheme. 

 

8.1       QUESTION SUBMITTED BY COUNCILLOR GARDNER TO THE CABINET MEMBER FOR FAMILIES, EDUCATION AND WELLBEING- COUNCILLOR O’BRIEN:

 

“Can the Cabinet member confirm that the Hillingdon Youth Council has continued to be a voice for young people in the Borough despite the pandemic? Can she say how many schools in Hayes are involved in the initiative and if the case is that the young people of Hayes are underrepresented, what steps are planned to increase this number, so that the membership of the Youth Council can effectively represent the whole Borough?”

 

Councillor O’Brien advised that the Youth Council included young people aged 11 to 19 (and those aged up to 25 with special educational needs) providing a voice for those who lived, worked or studied in the Borough.  The Youth Council provided young people with the opportunity to develop their skills, confidence and knowledge.  The Hillingdon Youth Council had 18 active members representing a number of schools from across the Borough including: Bishopshalt, Douay Martyrs, Haydon, Merchant Taylors, Oakwood, Ruislip High and Swakeleys. 

 

Throughout the pandemic, the Youth Council had remained active and had held meetings virtually.  Councillor O’Brien had taken part in a Q&A session, quiz and debate with representatives at a Youth Council meeting in June 2021.  One of the Youth Council members had said, “During lockdown, I have found the virtual HYC meetings to be a window into the world.  It’s a place where I am welcome, my views are heard and I can have deep discussions and debates with my friends.”

 

The Youth Council had sought to make a difference with work and surveys on issues such as domestic abuse, knife crime reduction and waste and recycling.  The Youth Council worked in partnership with the UK Youth Parliament, on which Hillingdon had two representatives. In addition, Hillingdon had two London Youth Assembly representatives, one of whom was the Deputy Chair. 

 

Although the Youth Council was located at Fountains Mill, consideration was being given to moving them to the Civic Centre so that they could use the Council Chamber for their meetings.  Action would also be taken to increase young people’s engagement with the Youth Council and to promote and forge new links with young people from across the Borough.  Ward Councillors were encouraged to raise awareness of the important work undertaken by the dedicated Youth Council. 

 

By way of a supplementary question, Councillor Gardner asked whether the Youth Council could be encouraged to make physical contact with the young people in schools in the Hayes area to hear the views and worries of students about their environment following the tragic incident that took place near the Global Academy in June 2021. 

 

Councillor O’Brien advised that the Youth Teams would once again be going into schools (now that they had reconvened following the summer holidays) to talk to the students and promote the Youth Council.  She noted that, following the incident in June, Global Academy had taken exceptional measures to work with students. 

 

8.4       QUESTION SUBMITTED BY COUNCILLOR MAKWANA TO THE CABINET MEMBER FOR FAMILIES, EDUCATION AND WELLBEING- COUNCILLOR O’BRIEN:

 

“Could the Cabinet Member please update Council on the number of school places offered to primary and secondary pupils in Hillingdon this academic year?”

 

Councillor O’Brien advised that Hillingdon had continued with its strong track record of offering school places to children in the Borough.  The Council’s £154m school building and expansion programme would help to meet future demand.  This had meant that, for the last 15 years, Hillingdon had managed to stay ahead of the demand for school places in the Borough and education remained a top priority for the Council. 

 

This summer, 3,664 Hillingdon resident primary school applications had been processed for starting in Reception.  This had been a 5.7% decrease on the previous year (across London the number of applications had decreased by 6.72%).  Hillingdon had had the sixth highest number of applications in London: 99.3% of children had been offered their preferred primary school places and 93.7% had been offered their first preference, rating Hillingdon second across London for giving parents their first preference choice. 

 

This summer, Hillingdon had processed 3,607 Hillingdon resident secondary school applications for starting in Year 7.  This had been a 3% decrease on the previous year (across London the number of applications had increased by 0.4%) and coincided with an increase in the number of children being home schooled during the pandemic.  Hillingdon had received the ninth highest number of applications in London: 94% of children had been offered their preferred secondary school places and 67% had been offered their first preference. 

 

Over the last week, Hillingdon had already received approximately 500 in year / late applications.  This was an exceptionally high number and officers were working their way through them. 

 

There was no supplementary question.

 

8.2       QUESTION SUBMITTED BY COUNCILLOR PRINCE TO THE CABINET MEMBER FOR HEALTH AND SOCIAL CARE - COUNCILLOR PALMER:

 

“What additional mental health support has the Council provided to residents as a result of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic?”

 

Councillor Palmer advised that, pre-pandemic, around one in four people had experienced mental health problems in any given year.  This had increased during the pandemic, with many existing support services stepping up to deal with the increase in demand and new initiatives being launched.  The Covid grant had been used to offset additional costs.

 

The response of mental health support services could be seen in the wider context of the Council’s Covid response.  Adult social work had maintained statutory services throughout the pandemic, with a 137% increase in needs assessments and 51% increase in adult safeguarding enquiries where mental health had been the primary support reason. 

 

The Council had continued to work closely with Central and North West London NHS Foundation Trust (CNWL) who provided a range of mental health services.  Officers had continued to signpost residents to self-referral services such as CNWL’s Single Point of Access and Talking Therapy services.  Referrals had been made to Crisis, the Home Treatment Team and the Liaison Psychiatry Team.  Additional services had been set up including: a Mental Health Emergency Access Centre which had helped to move people out of A&E; and a step down house to bridge the gap between hospital and long term accommodation.

 

Young people had continued to have access to services such as KOOTH.  It had also been agreed by Cabinet that Hillingdon People would be used to help support the mental health of young people under 16. 

 

The voluntary sector had played its part by commissioning extra services such as mental health employment support.  The Community Hub had contacted over 28k residents who had been classed as clinically extremely vulnerable to assess their mental health needs and Mind had seen a 260% increase in calls to its telephone support service.  Library staff had called residents to ensure that they were not left lonely and isolated and many Councillors had volunteered to collect prescriptions.  Councillor Tuckwell, as the Council’s mental health champion, had been looking at where improvements could be made to service delivery. 

 

Councillor Palmer thanked the Social Care Team for ensuring that Hillingdon kept its residents safe and the voluntary sector and health colleagues for their role in partnership working.  

 

By way of a supplementary question, Councillor Prince asked, with the Government cutting Universal Credit by £20 per week, what action the Council was taking to provide mental health support to those residents experiencing problem debt accrued during the pandemic. 

 

Councillor Palmer advised that the services provided by the Council did not differentiate against someone’s mental health.  The Council had been working in partnership with the voluntary sector and was able to signpost residents experiencing mental ill health and make positive referrals to services provided by organisations such as the Citizens Advice Bureau. 

 

If Councillor Prince had specific issues that she would like to highlight, Councillor Palmer asked that she make contact with her or Councillor Tuckwell outside of the meeting. 

30.

Motions pdf icon PDF 52 KB

To consider Motions submitted by Members in accordance with Council Procedure Rule 12

Minutes:

9.4      MOTION FROM COUNCILLOR CORTHORNE

 

Councillor Corthorne moved, and Councillor Edwards seconded, the following motion:

 

“That this Council welcomes the establishment of the UK Government's "Operation Warm Welcome" programme to ensure that those refugees from Afghanistan who served alongside and assisted British forces and their families are supported as they look to rebuild their lives in the UK.

 

“This Council notes that the UK and, specifically, the London Borough of Hillingdon has a proud history of providing a safe haven and support to those fleeing persecution. The Council gave an early undertaking to receive Afghan families under the Government’s Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy and it is continuing to work with Government in support of the national resettlement programme.

 

“This Council notes the considerable responsibility and continuous commitment of the London Borough of Hillingdon in supporting refugees from across the globe given the local authority's status as a port of entry into the UK through Heathrow Airport.

 

“This Council resolves to:

·            Support the Government's "Operation Warm Welcome" programme and assist refugee families from Afghanistan as they resettle in the UK.

·            Work with national and local charities and partner agencies to ensure that Afghan refugees settling in the London Borough of Hillingdon have access to appropriate support to develop language skills, gain employment and integrate into the life of the borough.

·            Provide the children of Afghan refugees settling in the London Borough of Hillingdon with appropriate educational support.

·            Work with Government, London Councils, the Mayor of London and landlords to provide appropriate housing for Afghan refugees in the London Borough of Hillingdon without putting further pressure on the demand for social housing.”

 

Following debate (Councillor Makwana), Councillor Prince moved the following amendment, which was seconded by Councillor Nelson:

 

That a further bullet point be added to the end of the proposed motion to read:

 

·           Petition the UK Government to ensure that the policies and resources needed are in place to support the welcoming, settling and wellbeing of refugees in the UK.”

 

Following debate (Councillors Edwards and Simmonds), the amendment was put to a recorded vote:

 

Those voting for: Councillors Allen, Birah, Bliss, Curling, Dhillon, Dhot, Eginton, Farley, Gardner, Lakhmana, Money, Morse, Nelson, Oswell, Prince, Sansarpuri and Sweeting.

 

Those voting against: The Mayor (Councillor Chamdal), the Deputy Mayor (Councillor Haggar), Councillors Ahmad-Wallana, Arnold, Barnes, Bianco, Bridges, Brightman, Burrows, Chapman, Choubedar, Cooper, Corthorne, Davies, Denys, Deville, Edwards, Flynn, Goddard, Hensley, Higgins, Lavery, Makwana, Melvin, D Mills, R Mills, Morgan, O’Brien, Palmer, Puddifoot, Radia, Riley, Rodrigues, Simmonds, Sullivan, Tuckwell and Yarrow.

 

Those abstaining: None. 

 

The amendment was lost. 

 

The original motion was put to the vote and it was:

 

RESOLVED:  That this Council welcomes the establishment of the UK Government's "Operation Warm Welcome" programme to ensure that those refugees from Afghanistan who served alongside and assisted British forces and their families are supported as they look to rebuild their lives in the UK.

 

This Council notes that the UK and, specifically, the London Borough of Hillingdon has a proud history of providing a safe haven and support to those fleeing persecution. The Council gave an early undertaking to receive Afghan families under the Government’s Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy and it is continuing to work with Government in support of the national resettlement programme.

 

This Council notes the considerable responsibility and continuous commitment of the London Borough of Hillingdon in supporting refugees from across the globe given the local authority's status as a port of entry into the UK through Heathrow Airport.

 

This Council resolves to:

·            Support the Government's "Operation Warm Welcome" programme and assist refugee families from Afghanistan as they resettle in the UK.

·            Work with national and local charities and partner agencies to ensure that Afghan refugees settling in the London Borough of Hillingdon have access to appropriate support to develop language skills, gain employment and integrate into the life of the borough.

·            Provide the children of Afghan refugees settling in the London Borough of Hillingdon with appropriate educational support.

·            Work with Government, London Councils, the Mayor of London and landlords to provide appropriate housing for Afghan refugees in the London Borough of Hillingdon without putting further pressure on the demand for social housing.

 

9.1       MOTION FROM COUNCILLOR DUNCAN

 

At the request of Councillor Duncan, who had submitted her apologies for the meeting, it was agreed that this motion be held over until the next meeting of the Council on 18 November 2021.

 

“That this Council believes planning works best when developers and the local community work together to shape local areas and deliver necessary new homes and other developments and, therefore, calls on the Government to protect the right of communities to object to individual planning applications.”

 

RESOLVED: 

 

9.2       MOTION FROM COUNCILLOR DHILLON

 

Councillor Dhillon moved, and Councillor Allen seconded, the following motion:

 

“That this Council is concerned by the number of cases involving unsafe building practices and standards affecting the safety of Hillingdon residents by private building control operators and their practices.

 

“We therefore call upon the Leader and Cabinet Member to examine the issues in Hillingdon and make them known to the government with a request to strengthen the legislation / regulation and accountability of such private building control operators to be on par with those our own local authority building control services.”

 

Following debate (Councillor Lavery), the motion was put to the vote. 

 

The motion was lost.

 

9.3      MOTION FROM COUNCILLOR CURLING

 

Councillor Curling moved, and Councillor Mathers seconded, the following motion:

 

“That this Council recognises the growing problem of the recreational use of Nitrous Oxide, as a psychoactive substance, across the borough. This is not only harmful to the individuals inhaling it, but it also contributes to public safety dangers associated with people driving whilst under the influence of a psychoactive substance, as well as, anti-social behaviour and huge amounts of littering of disused gas cannisters and balloons.

 

“Although it is illegal to supply and use Nitrous Oxide for this purpose, it remains a considerable problem for the residents of Hillingdon to endure. Council therefore calls on the Cabinet to take some proactive action to achieve some positive results in the following four areas:

·           A campaign to raise awareness and discourage the use of Nitrous Oxide.

·           Better enforcement action.

·           Investigating Illegal Sales.

·           Tackling the littering problem.”

 

Councillor Riley moved the following amendment, which was seconded by CouncillorDenys:

 

That the words “huge amounts of” be deleted from the first paragraph and that everything after the first paragraph be deleted and replaced with:

 

We welcome the Home Secretary's recent announcement of a review to be undertaken by Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs, of the possibility of including the possession, use and sale etc for psychoactive substances for recreational use being a class C drugs offence and we will continue to work with partner agencies to raise awareness, aid enforcement and discourage the misuse of this substance".

 

Following debate (Councillors Allen, Curling, Dhillon, Hensley, D Mills and Sansarpuri), the amendment was put to the vote.

 

The amendment was carried. 

 

The substantive motion was put to the vote and it was:

 

RESOLVED:  That this Council recognises the growing problem of the recreational use of Nitrous Oxide as a psychoactive substance, across the borough. This is not only harmful to the individuals inhaling it, but it also contributes to public safety dangers associated with people driving whilst under the influence of a psychoactive substance as well as anti-social behaviour and littering of disused gas canisters and balloons.

 

We welcome the Home Secretary's recent announcement of a review to be undertaken by Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs, of the possibility of including the possession, use and sale etc for psychoactive substances for recreational use being a class C drugs offence and we will continue to work with partner agencies to raise awareness, aid enforcement and discourage the misuse of this substance.

Recorded Vote
TitleTypeRecorded Vote textResult
9.4 Motion from Councillor Corthorne (Amendment) Amendment Rejected
  • View Recorded Vote for this item
  • 31.

    Adjournment Debate

    In accordance with Council Rule 15, to hold an Adjournment Debate, submitted by Councillor Mathers on the subject of ‘Litter’.

    Minutes:

    An Adjournment Debate on the subject of ‘litter’ was conducted in accordance with Council Procedure Rule 15.  Councillors Bridges, Dhillon, Mathers, R.Mills and Tuckwell spoke on the matter.